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FROZEN
MOMENT


LIVE
ACTION


STOP-
START


SLOW
MOTION


TIME
RAMP


SPACE
RAMP


TIME
BLUR


SPACE
BLUR


LONG
EXPOSURE


MULTIPLE
EXPOSURE


OPEN
FLASH


FLASH
TRAIL


LIGHT
PAINTING


MOTION
DISTORTION


MATCH
CUT


UNIVERSAL
CAPTURE



TECHNIQUES - TIME BLUR


Time blur is motion blur which results purely from the movement of the subject over time. Time blur usually requires relatively long exposures but it can also be created from multiple frames through interpolation - as in the example to the right.

The shutter speeds of the cameras in Digital Air's systems can be much longer than the frame rate. As a result time blur can be introduced to a shot even at very high frame rates (in cinema cameras higher frame rates necessitate shorter shutter speeds). Additionally, time blur in our systems can be time-progressive, as in the example below.

It's important to note that the virtual point-of-view of our systems can "move" relative to a time-blurred subject without the time blur effecting the background (or any static objects in the scene). This is because Digital Air's systems simulate a virtual moving point of view by cutting across static camera positions - and non-moving objects in static shots are unaffected by time blur (as in the example to the right in which the background is sharp in spite of the interpolated time blur).

By simultaneously opening and then sequentially closing the shutters in our systems we can also record scenes in which the subject is moving and leaving an accumulative trail of time blur (this is similar to the light painting effect only the subject itself becomes the light source). Because this creates a situation where each frame has a different shutter speed an exposure compensation may be made in the aperture settings or with NDs, or the effect can be recorded with a moving subject on a black background.





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original time sequence


interpolated time blur




EXAMPLE - TIME BLUR


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Project: test - twirling Christmas tree lights

Equipment: 32 camera HD-1 digital system









This example of time blur was recorded with 32 digital cameras running synchronously and out of phase by 1/60th of a second. The cameras were arranged and triggered in a circle such that the triggering cycle revolved constantly around the circle making one complete revolution approximately every half second. Each camera's shutter speed was 1/4 sec. The result is extreme time blur that looks like the cameras were running at only 4 fps while the subject actually moves in slow motion because the frame rate of the final shot is 60 fps.