digitalair.com 
   
 




FROZEN
MOMENT


LIVE
ACTION


STOP-
START


SLOW
MOTION


TIME
RAMP


SPACE
RAMP


TIME
BLUR


SPACE
BLUR


LONG
EXPOSURE


MULTIPLE
EXPOSURE


OPEN
FLASH


FLASH
TRAIL


LIGHT
PAINTING


MOTION
DISTORTION


MATCH
CUT


UNIVERSAL
CAPTURE



TECHNIQUES - SPACE BLUR


Space blur is similar to time blur but on the spatial axis. Space blur looks like motion blur resulting from movement of the camera (see example to the right below).

With a single still camera space blur can be captured by moving the camera during the exposure. But with Digital Air's systems the individual cameras within the system are not necessarily moving, moreover, if the subject is a frozen moment there is usually no time to move the cameras. As a result space blur generally requires the use of interpolation.

Because any number of frames (camera positions) can be interpolated to create space blur the effect can range anywhere from barely noticeable to infinitely extreme. As a result shots can blur in and out to such a degree that their subjects completely disappear and reappear.

Objects placed at the nodal point of a curved camera system will tend to remain relatively sharp even when extreme space blur is applied. You can see this in the image of Jennifer Love Hewitt to the right. This was shot with our 80 lens curved Timetrack™ camera and all 80 frames were interpolated to make this one image. This contrast between blurred background and sharp subject can be amplified by compositing a sharp base-line raw image sequence of the subject (the green frames in the graphic below) over a space blurred background plate (the yellow frames below interpolated together across space).






time blur
(temporal motion blur with no spatial component)


space blur
(spatial motion blur with no temporal component)





EXAMPLE - SPACE BLUR


Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player



Project: Carte Aura TV commercial (test)

Equipment: Timetrack™ 80 lens curved camera
Client: Carte Aura
Director: Paolo Gandola
Production Company: ADV Production (Milan)
Producer: Paolo Villani
Post Production: Digital Air and Interactive Group (Milan)

link to finished spot: http://www.digitalair.com/carteaura.html








This example of space blur is actually a combination of space blur and time blur (both interpolated). The first frame of the shot is all of the frames from the blurred part of the shot averaged together. Each successive frame of the blurred part of the shot is then averaged from progressively fewer frames until the blur disappears. If this shot was pure space blur the dancer would remain relatively sharp and the background would blur. If it was pure time blur the background would remain sharp and only the dancer would blur.